Posts Tagged ‘George Ciccariello-Maher’

To download, right-click and select “Save link as…” END OF 2014 PT.2

http://georgeciccariello.com/

We had him on the show before to talk about Venezuela and radical political science

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To download, right-click and select “Save link as…” END OF 2014 PT.1

http://georgeciccariello.com/

We had him on the show before to talk about Venezuela and radical political science

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George will join us over the phone (again) look him up: http://georgeciccariello.com/

We would like to take the opportunity to launch a new academic interdisciplinary field of study: Anybody doing social science (broadly defines and including history of course) these days–and doing it RIGHT–knows this is a necessary approach to understanding the non-linear interconnectedness of the multidimensional crises we’re experiencing.

I like to call it CLUSTER-FUCK STUDIES.

With Jesse V and me in the studio we’ll also have some of the usual degenerates: Jay G and Felix B.

As the title suggests, we’re going to attempt a “year in review” thingy.

We will be on the air live 2-4PM EST on WPRK91.5FM (available live on tunein and here) and soon as a podcast on punkonomics.org, sticher, itunes, etc

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http://venezuelanalysis.com/analysis/10891

Excellent article by George Ciccariello-Maher who was a guest of our show last year (check out the podcast): 

https://punkonomics.org/2013/07/09/show-40-george-ciccariello-maher-on-the-peoples-history-of-the-venezuelan-revolution/

Former interviewee participates in a very balanced discussion about current events in Venezuela.

Punkonomics is proud to remind everybody that we were one of the first to interview George at some length on Venezuela and we’re very happy his voice has become so prominent :)

Here’s the interview podcast from 2013-7-8

Former guest of Punkonomics George Ciccariello-Maher explains:

 

Check out our interview on Venezuela here

George Ciccariello-Maher is the author of We Created Chávez: A People’s History of the Venezuelan Revolution (2013)

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There’s a complete bio on my prior post announcing the show here, and more info as well as a wealth of other writing on George’s website.

Directly below is an outline of the main questions we asked in the interview but you’ll have to listen to the podcast for his fascinating answers. And then you should read the book too. We hope very much to have the opportunity to talk to him again about the developments in this dynamic and part of the world. At a time when most of the globe is going from bad to worse, the Bolivarian republics of Latin America seem to be a beacon of hope–not perfect but showing clear measurable improvement in the standard of living of the majority of their population. This is more than almost all other countries can say for themselves…

Question outline:

> We had a show defending Chavez’s political and economic record right after he died in March

> You have a special point of view:

>> You see Chavez as a chapter in a larger story

>> The book displaces the debate from the man himself to looking at the Venezuelan people instead of their leaders: A people’s history like Howard Zinn‘s A people’s History of the US.

> Where did your personal interest come from?

> Book starts from fall of dictatorship in 58 and the beginning of “democracy”  Why?

> Chavez is not the focus: What then IS his contribution/importance?

> Is Venezuela special in S. America? in the world? How so?

> Jesse Velez asked about the recent developments now that Chavez is dead?

> Explain the structure of the opposition to Chavez and now Maduro:

>> from the radical left

>> from the right

>> how did they get so many votes in the last election?

> Any lessons for the US in all this?

  • Foreign policy (vis-a-vis global people’s movements)
  • Domestic: horizontal/vertical reforms
  • #occupy?

> Jesse Velez asked about popular movements in his native Puerto Rico.

> Finally: On a different local issue we touched upon the Zimmerman trial and the critical importance of understanding the historical context behind such divisive painful issues in order to develop empathy which is what makes us human.